Detective Chief Fired for Arresting Bowen as a Phagan Suspect

Detective Chief Fired for Arresting Bowen

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Constitution

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

Former Atlantan, Who Was Taken Into Custody in Houston, Texas, Early on Monday Night, Released After an Investigation by Chief of Police Department, Who Says He Is Convinced of His Innocence.

BOWEN WAS IN CHINERO ON DAY OF THE MURDER HE TELLS DETECTIVES

His Father, Cal Bowen, of Newnan, Ga., Received a Message Last Night From His Son, Declaring That He Had Been Fired — Bowen Is Well Connected in Georgia and His Friends Are Indignant Over His Arrest.

Paul P. Bowen, former Atlantan, who was arrested in Houston, Texas, Monday night on suspicion of being connected with the Phagan murder mystery, as told in The Constitution extra Tuesday morning, was released from custody last night, and declare guiltless by the police chief of that city.

George Peyton, chief of the detective force, who led the arresting party, has been discharged as a result of the arrest, on the ground that he “exceeded his authority” in taking Bowen into custody. Continue Reading →

Two New Witnesses in Phagan Mystery to Testify Thursday

Two New Witnesses in Phagan Mystery to Testify ThursdayAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

Detectives Said to Attach Much Importance to Testimony That Two Girls Will Give When Inquest Resumes

INQUEST WILL BE ENDED THURSDAY, SAYS DONEHOO

Paul P. Bowen Has Been Released by Houston Officials—Chief Detective and 14 Policemen Are Discharged

Two new witnesses, whom the detectives have recently located, are expected to give testimony of importance at the final session of the Phagan inquest Thursday.

One of the witnesses is Miss Grace Hix, of 100 McDonough road, daughter of James E. Hix. Miss Hix worked at the same machine with Mary Phagan, but has not been to the factory since the latter was slain. Miss Hix was closeted for two hours with the detectives Tuesday evening, but it is not known just what her testimony will be. [Appears to be missing words in the printing—Ed.] day Mary Phagan was killed, but did not see her, according to a statement she made to a Journal reporter Wednesday afternoon at 2:45 o’clock. Continue Reading →

Solicitor Dorsey Orders Body Exhumed in the Hope of Getting New Evidence

Solicitor Dorsey Orders Body Exhumed in the Hope of Getting New EvidenceAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

Inquest, To Be Resumed Thursday, Will Bring Out Important Facts Not Yet Made Public—Medical Experts To Be Called by Coroner.

New mystery was added to the Mary Phagan case on Wednesday, when the authorities for some reason not yet disclosed, did not follow out the order given by Solicitor Dorsey for the exhumation of the remains.

It was said by Solicitor Dorsey that he had given this order in the hope that new clews might be discovered.

A difference of opinion as to the advisability of the exhumation evidently has arisen, but the officials concerned were reticent. Coroner Donehoo admitted that Dorsey’s order had been given, but said it had not been carried out. He would make no further statement.

The report published in an early edition of The Georgian that the body had been exhumed was made on statements by officials, and that it was for the purpose of making a microscopic examination of every wound on the body for finger prints and other clews.

It is undoubtedly the intention of the authorities to exhume the body again. Continue Reading →

Paul Bowen, Held in Houston, Known Here But Left Atlanta in October; Hasn’t Been Back

Paul Bowen

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, May 6th, 1913

Negative Alibi Seems Established for Young Man Held in Texas City as Suspected Murderer of Mary Phagan in Atlanta — Police There Say “Strong Evidence,” but Nothing Shows Young Man Was Around Here April 26

BROTHER, IN NEWNAN, SAYS PAUL HAS BEEN IN HOUSTON SIX WEEKS; OUT WEST SINCE OCTOBER

Two Friends, Young Men in Atlanta, Report Recent Letters From Him—Brother Has Had One—So Has Father—Detectives Say Quinn Changed His Story—Newt Lee Declares Murder Must Have Occurred During the Afternoon

A negative alibi established for Paul P. Bowen by several authorities, among whom are his brother and his father Newnan, seems to clear the young man arrested Monday night in Houston, Tex, from any suspicious connection with the murder of Mary Phagan in Atlanta on the night of April 26. Continue Reading →

Brother Declares Bowen Left Georgia in August

Brother Declares Bowen Left Georgian in AugustAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Tuesday, May 6th, 1913

Paul P. Bowen, arrested in Houston, Texas, on suspicion of complicity in the murder of Mary Phagan, could not have been connected with the Atlanta mystery, according to members of his family here.

Albert Bowen, a brother, said Paul Bowen has been in the West since last August, when he went to Arkansas to work for the Rock Island Railraod. He has never been back to Georgia since, he declared, but has spent the time in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

On April 21, Albert Bowen declared, he received a letter from Paul written at Alto, Texas, April 17 and mailed at Tyler, Texas, April 18, in which he mentioned having been to Lufkin a few days before. Another letter, he said, was written from El Reno, Okla., April 4, and one was received just previous to that from Warren, Ark.

The Bowen family stands well here, the brother, Albert and father being connected with mercantile establishments here in responsible positions. Friends of the family declare their belief in Paul Bowen’s innocence.

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Atlanta Georgian, May 6th 1913, “Brother Declares Bowen Left Georgia in August,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Bowen Still Held by Houston Police in the Phagan Case

Bowen Still Held by the Houston Police

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Tuesday, May 6th, 1913

Atlanta Police Do Not Believe He is Implicated in Tragedy—Letters From Women and 50 Photographs of Girls Found in Prisoners Trunk.

The Atlanta police and State officials say they place little importance in the arrest of Paul P. Bowen, the former Atlanta youth who is being held by the Houston authorities.

In Bowen’s trunk was found a mass of clippings telling of the Phagan killing, and at least 50 photographs of girls and young women. Several times while he was being questioned, Bowen is said to have contradicted himself.

Bowen stoutly maintains his innocence. Relatives and friends of his in Atlanta say his arrest is preposterous.

Atlanta detectives have investigated thoroughly Bowen’s history in Atlanta and declared Tuesday afternoon that they have virtually established an alibi for him. Having satisfied themselves of the probability of Bowen’s innocence, they are continuing on their original line of investigation and have abandoned the theory that Bowen could have been involved. Continue Reading →

Story of Paul Bowen’s Arrest as Told by Associated Press

Story of Paul Bowens Arrest as Told by Associated Press

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, May 6th, 1913

The actions of a man giving his name as Paul P. Bowen, observed by a woman boarder at the hotel where he was stopping, and the story she told the police, caused his arrest here last night. Bowen is held on suspicion, the charge being based on telegrams from the Atlanta, Ga., police, saying that Bowen may be wanted in connection with the murder of Mary Phagan in Atlanta.

From Bowen’s trunk the police obtained a woman’s vest which they say was blood-stained, copies of Atlanta newspapers and photographs which they identified as that of the murdered girl, Mary Phagan.

The police also found a packet of letters which they are examining this morning.

The woman informant gave her name as Mrs. A. Blanchette. The police say she resides here and so far as they can learn, she had no previous acquaintance with Bowen. Continue Reading →

Pictures of Fifty Girls Found in Search of Bowen’s Trunk

Pictures of Fifty Girls Found in Search of Bowen's Trunk

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, May 6th, 1913

BY KENNETH TODD.

Formerly reporter on The Atlanta Journal, now the special correspondent in Houston.

(Special Dispatch to The Journal.)

Paul P. Bowen, a round-faced youth of twenty years, was arrested in Houston by detectives Monday night in connection with the murder of Mary Phagan in Atlanta several days ago.

Information furnished the department by Mrs. A. Blanchett, of Texas City, led to the arrest. Bowen and Mrs. Blanchett occupied adjoining rooms at the St. Jean hotel Sunday night, according to the story she told detectives. She saw young Bowen reading an Atlanta paper and saw him collapse while reading an account of the murder. Continue Reading →

Phagan Girl’s Body Again Exhumed for Finger-Print Clews

Phagan Girl's Body Again Exhumed

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

Third Time Unfortunate Victim’s Remains Have Been Exhumed—Dorsey Says Officials Are Not Looking for Finger Prints, but Other Clews.

The body of Mary Phagan was exhumed early Wednesday for the second time in two days.

The unofficial explanation is that the exhumation is made for the purpose of making a microscopic and minute examination of every wound on the body for finger prints and other clews as well.

Solicitor Dorsey let it be known that the police are not working on the idea that the finger prints would be helpful in solving the mystery, if indeed there are any finger prints to be found, as the body has been embalmed and has been handled by many persons since it was first discovered in the basement of the pencil factory.

Nevertheless, it may be safely said that a microscopital [sic] examination will be made of every mark on the body.

It was reported before the departure was made for Marietta that a Bertillon expert had been engaged and that if any finger prints were found, photographs would be taken and the most careful measurements made for the purpose of comparison. Continue Reading →

Bowen Given Liberty, Makes Full Statement

Bowen Given LibertyAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

P. P. Bowen, who was arrested here yesterday on suspicion in connection with an Atlanta case and who was released last night, made this statement today:

“My father is S. C. Bowen. He lives at Newnan, Ga. I told the detectives that they had made a mistake at the time they arrested me, and knew that they would soon find this to be so, if they investigated my references and letters. Of course, I was scared when they entered my room. I did meet them at the door with an open knife, and before I knew who they were I did say that if I had a gun they would not have come into my room. I meant it, too.”

Bowen gives his record since 1908 as follows: Continue Reading →

Employe of Lunch Stand Near Pencil Factory is Trailed to Alabama

Employe of Lunch Stand Near Pencil Factory isAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

Detectives Figure Strangling Was a Typical Mediterranean Crime—Solicitor Dorsey Grills Watchman Lee in Effort to Get New Points.

A new and sensational interpretation was given the Phagan mystery Wednesday afternoon when it was revealed that Pinkerton detectives are trailing a Greek now missing who was employed in a restaurant near the National Pencil factory before the crime was committed.

The reasons that the city detectives give for the adoption of the new theory are:

The slaying of Mary Phagan was not a negro crime, as the only negro who has been suspected in the case, Newt Lee, would have fled from the scene.

The notes which were left with the evident intention of diverting suspicion from the actual criminal were too subtle for Lee to have framed.

Strangulation, the method by which Mary Phagan was killed, is not a negro method of killing.

But this method is typical of the Mediterranean countries.

Working along these new lines, the detectives are of the opinion that the crime was not committed inside the National Pencil Factory. They believe that the girl was attacked outside the factory and that her body was taken inside with the intention of hiding it ultimately in the furnace, although the body never reached there. Continue Reading →

Fourteen Houston Policemen Fired on Bowen’s Account

Fourteen Houston Policemen Fired on Bowens AccountAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Wednesday, May 7th, 1913

BY KENNETH TODD.

HOUSTON, Tex., May 7.—Although young Paul P. Bowen, arrested in Houston Monday as a suspect in the Mary Phagan case, has been released by the chief of police, the release was ordered against the wishes of the chief of detectives and the latter has been summarily discharged for opposing his superior in spite of the telegram from Chief Beavers, of Atlanta, to Chief Davison, of the local department.

Bowen was released twenty-four hours after the message was received. Chief of Detectives Peyton stubbornly refused to let the youth go free, so Chief Davison procured the keys and acted as turnkey. He also discharged Peyton and started a row that has the police department up in the air. Fourteen members of the department were discharged. Claiming that the discharge of Bowen was actuated largely by spite and before a thorough investigation had been made local Pinkerton’s agents as well as private detectives are doing some work on their own accord.

The row between the chief of police and the chief of detectives was caused when the latter gave out the story to an afternoon paper without consulting the head of the department and mentioning his name.

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Atlanta Journal, May 7th 1913, “Fourteen Houston Policemen Fired on Bowen’s Account,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)