Hearing for Gantt at 3 P.M. Wednesday

Hearing for Gantt 3 pm WednesdayAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Wednesday, April 30th, 1913

Judge Gober Says His Client Will Be Taken Before Justice of the Peace Powers

J. M. Gantt, held on a warrant charging the murder of Mary Phagan, will given a hearing before Justice F. M. Powers at 3 o’clock Wednesday afternoon. Gantt was Tuesday afternoon transferred from police barracks to the jail on an order issued by Judge Bell.

Justice Powers, who issued the warrant for Gantt’s arrest, had not been notified of the hearing at 8:30 o’clock Wednesday morning, but it was stated at the office of Judge George Gober, attorney for Gantt, that the hearing will be held at 3 o’clock.

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Atlanta Journal, April 30th 1913, “Hearing for Gantt at 3 P.M. Wednesday,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Reward of $1,000 is Appropriated by City

Reward of 1000 AppropriatedAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Wednesday, April 30th, 1913

Money Will Be Paid for Information Leading to Arrest of Girl’s Murderer

At a special session called at 10 o’clock Wednesday morning, the city council of Atlanta voted for the appropriation of $1,000 as a reward for information leading to the arrest of the party or parties guilty of the brutal murder of little Mary Phagan. In the building of the National Pencil company’s factory on Forsyth street, last Saturday afternoon or night.

Immediately afterward the aldermanic board met and concurred in the appropriation. Continue Reading →

Negro Watchman Wrote Note Found Beside Dead Girl, Experts Declare, After Seeing Frank’s Handwriting

Negro Watchman Wrote Note Beside Dead Girl

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Wednesday, April 30th, 1913

The Journal’s Three Handwriting Experts Still Firm in Their Conviction That Newt Lee Wrote Mysterious Notes When Shown Copies Written by Both Frank and Lee in Comparison With Original Note Found

Having compared exact reproductions of the notes found near the body of Mary Phagan with specimens of the handwriting of Newt Lee, the night watchman, and of Leo M. Frank, the superintendent of the National Pencil company, three handwriting experts Tuesday morning stuck to their first opinion that the negro’s handwriting and that of the notes found near the girl are the same.

They did this after a minute examination of the copy of the note written by Frank under direction of the detectives. Each then declared in effect that although it was within the bounds of possibility for Frank to have written the notes found near the girl, that it was extremely improbable. Continue Reading →

Witnesses Positive Murdered Girl Was Same Who Created Scene at the Terminal Station on Friday

Witnesses Positive Murdered Girl was Same Who Created Scene at the Terminal Station on FridayAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Gatemen, T. R. Malone and H. P. Sibley, After Viewing Corpse, Declare Mary Phagan, Sobbing Loudly and Displaying Vehement Feelings, Prevented Strange Man From Boarding Train for Washington—Neither of Men Detained by Police Is Mysterious Stranger

H. P. SIBLEY, gateman and T. R. Malone, special officer at the Atlanta Terminal station, have identified the dead body of little Mary Phagan as the same girl whom they saw dramatically prevent a man from leaving on train No. 38 for Washington, D. C., Friday morning at 11:01 o’clock.

Both men declare a young man apparently about twenty-five years of age, blue eyes, light hair, weight about 135 pounds and between 5 feet 8 or 9 inches tall, dressed in a dark business suit and wearing a derby hat, reached the gate that led down to the tracks from which 38 left a few minutes before train time.

“Just as the man reached the gate,” said Mr. Sibley, “and showed me his ticket to Washington, a pretty little girl in her early teens slipped up behind him and caught him by the arm. He seemed irritated and pushed her away. ‘You are trying to get away from me,’ she cried stamping her foot. ‘You are trying to leave me and you shan’t do it.’ Continue Reading →

Where Was Mary Phagan on Saturday Afternoon?

Where Was Mary Phagan on Saturday Afternoon

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Are there any friends or acquaintances of little Mary Phagan who saw her after she is supposed to have left the offices of the National Pencil company Saturday afternoon, where she went for the little pay that was due her?

Is there any one who knows the girl, who can say she was seen in the city of Atlanta or elsewhere following her departure from home shortly before noon on that day? Continue Reading →

Stepfather Thinks Negro is Murderer

Stepfather Thinks Negro is MurdererAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Believes That Newt Lee Bound and Gagged, Then Murdered Mary Phagan

W. J. Coleman, step-father of Mary Phagan, believes that she was murdered by Newt Lee, the negro night watchman, but that before the murder she lay bound and gagged in the factory of the National Pen [sic] company, 37 South Forsyth street, from shortly after noon on Saturday until past midnight.

As people passed back and forth along the street, as members of the girl’s family waited anxiously for her return, he thinks that she lay helpless within the factory, while the negro waited for an opportune time to attack and then murder her.

His belief is that as soon as she had been paid the wages that she went to the factory to collect, she passed into the dressing room, perhaps for a drink of water. There, in his opinion, the negro seized the girl and bound and gagged her. He says there is plain evidence in the dressing room that the girl was first attacked there. Continue Reading →

State Offers $200 Reward; City Will Follow With $1,000 For Mary Phagan’s Murderer

J. M. Gant [sic], who was arrested at Marietta and brough[t] to Atlanta Monday, charged with the death of Mary Phagan. [Gantt was in the factory on the Saturday of the murder to pick up a pair of shoes he had left since leaving the Pencil company. Leo M. Frank was very reluctant to let him inside the building. Originally, Frank's behavior towards Gantt was assumed to be because of Gantt's recent firing, even though there were no bad relations between the two -- Ed.]

J. M. Gant [sic], who was arrested at Marietta and brough[t] to Atlanta Monday, charged with the death of Mary Phagan. [Gantt was in the factory on the Saturday of the murder to pick up a pair of shoes he had left since leaving the Pencil company. Leo M. Frank was very reluctant to let him inside the building. Originally, Frank’s behavior towards Gantt was assumed to be because of Gantt’s recent firing, even though there were no bad relations between the two — Ed.]

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Mayor Woodward Calls Special Meeting of Council So That Reward Can Be Formally Offered—Governor Brown Issued Proclamation Tuesday Morning

Governor Joseph M. Brown Tuesday morning offered a reward of $200 for the apprehension and conviction of the murderer or murderers of Mary Phagan, and the city of Atlanta is expected to offer a $1,000 reward at a special meeting that has been called by Mayor James G. Woodward for Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock.

Mayor Woodward points out that this is one of the most atrocious crimes in Atlanta’s history and that the city cannot afford to let it go unheeded.

Following is the mayor’s message to council:

“Atlanta, Ga., April 29, 1913.

“To the General Council City of Atlanta:

“Gentlemen:

“The general council of the city of Atlanta is hereby called to convene in special session tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock, April 30, 1913, to take cognizance in an official way, of that most brutal crime that was committed in this city on last Saturday night. Continue Reading →

Gantt’s Release Asked in Habeas Corpus Writ

Gantt's Release Asked in Habeas Corpus WritAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Petition Made to Judge George L. Bell and Will Be Heard at 4 o’Clock

J. M. GANT [sic] charged with the murder of Mary Phagan is seeking his release upon a writ of habeas corpus.

Petition for such a writ was made Tuesday morning to Judge Bell of the superior court and he directed that a hearing be had at 4 o’clock Tuesday afternoon.

Judge Gober, attorney for Gant, made the petition, and will argue Tuesday afternoon for the immediate release of the former bookkeeper.

Gant sets forth in his petition to Judge Bell that he is absolutely innocent of the crime of which he is accused, and that his detention by the police is without reason or authority.

Gant was arrested Monday about noon in Marietta, as he was on his way from Atlanta to his mother’s home, who lives in the country a short distance from Marietta. Continue Reading →

Bloody Thumb Print is Found on Door

Screen Shot 2016-03-07 at 2.47.04 PMAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Murderer of Mary Phagan Probably Left Factory by the Rear Door

A bloody thumb print, found Tuesday afternoon on the rear door to the basement of the National Pencil factory, leads the police to the theory that the murderer of Mary Phagan left the factory building by that door after he had deposited the girl’s body in the basement.

This theory is still further strengthened by the fact that when the murder was discovered Sunday morning it was found that a staple had been drawn from the fastening on the rear door.

R. B. Piron, said to be an employee of the pencil factory, came across the bloody thumb print while making an examination of the factory premises. He chiseled off the bloody spot and took it to Detective Chief Newport A. Lanford, who will have it analyzed to determine whether the stain is human blood. Continue Reading →

“God’s Vengeance Will Strike Brute Who Killed Her,” Says Grandfather of Mary Phagan

God's Vengeance Will Strike Brute

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

Calling upon God Almighty to visit speedy vengeance upon the murderer or murderers of his fourteen-year-old granddaughter, Mary Phagan, whose mutilated body was discovered Sunday morning in the basement of the National Pencil company’s factory on Forsyth street, W. J. Phagan, an elderly citizen of Marietta, declares that he will never rest until the fiend or fiends are brought to justice.

The old man almost collapsed when he learned of the awful crime, and he sobbed piteously as he prayed for divine aid in clearing up the mystery surrounding the murder of the girl.

“The living God will see to it that the brute is found and punished according to his sin,” declared Mr. Phagan. “I hope the murderer will be dealt with as he has dealt with that tender and innocent child. I hope that he suffers anguish and remorse in the same measure that she suffered pain and shame. No punishment is too great for him. Hanging cannot atone for the crime he has committed and the suffering he has caused both to his victim and her relatives.”

Mr. Phagan was so overcome that he had to take to his bed, but he declared that he would attend the inquest over the remains of his granddaughter Monday morning. However, his condition was such during the early morning that his relatives feared he would not be strong enough to make the trip to Atlanta and face the ordeal of the inquest.

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Atlanta Journal, April 28th 1913, “‘God’s Vengeance Will Strike Brute Who Killed Her,’ Says Grandfather of Mary Phagan,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Two Maundering Notes Add Mystery to Crime

Strand of Hair in Machine on Second Floor May Be Clew Left by Mary Phagan 2

1—Mary Phagan’s own handwriting, as shown in her address she wrote for Sunday School teacher. 2—Written by Lee at suggestion of detectives for purpose of comparison. 3—One of notes found in cellar. 4—Also written by Lee at suggestion of detectives.

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

City detectives, detailed to run down the murderer or murderers of fourteen-year-old Mary Phagan, are endeavoring to clear up the mystery surrounding the authorship of two crudely written and badly composed notes which were found near the corpse of the murdered girl in the basement of the pencil factory.

These notes were written in lead pencil. They are misspelled, incoherent and nearly unintellible [sic]. They present two questions to the minds of the detectives:

First: Were they really written by the girl while suffering the last throes of a delirious death?

Second: Are they the handiwork of the murderer, to divert suspicion from himself toward a fictitious negro. Continue Reading →

Thousands Visit Morgue to View Girl’s Body

Thousands Visit MorgueAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

Six thousand people, according to reliable estimates, visited P. J. Bloomfield’s undertaking parlors Monday morning to see the body of Mary Phagan.

It was the largest crowd, police say, that had ever viewed a murder victim’s body in Atlanta. Scores of friends, hundreds of acquaintances and fellow-workers in the pencil factory and thousands of simply curious walked around the bier between 7 o’clock and noon. So far as known, no relatives appeared. The mother of the girl is ill at her home as a consequence of her daughter’s death and other members of the family are at her bedside.

In the endless line in and out of the undertaker’s establishment were old men and young men and old women and young women. There were women with babes in their arms and fathers with their sons. And there were dozens of girls who worked in the pencil factory.

“It’s Mary, O it’s Mary,” sobbed one girl as she clasped the lifeless face of her former companion in her arms. She had heard of her friends’ death, but was overcome with grief when she looked on the lifeless body of the pretty fourteen-year-old girl.

There was little emotion displayed on the faces of most of those who called, though. Apparently they had come just out of curiosity.

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Atlanta Journal, April 28th 1913, “Thousands Visit Morgue to View Girl’s Body,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Man Held for Girl’s Murder Avows He Was With Another When Witness Saw Him Last

Man Held for Girl's Murder Avows

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

Arthur Mullinax, Trolley Conductor, Denies That E. L. Sentell Saw Him Saturday Night With Mary Phagan

Arthur Mullinax, identified by E. L. Sentell, of 22 Davis street, clerk for the Kamper Grocery company, as the man whom he saw with Mary Phagan, the murdered girl, at midnight Saturday, vehemently denies any part in the atrocious crime, and declares that he will be able to prove an alibi. Subjected to a quizzing in the office of Chief of Police Beavers, he told an apparently straightforward story of his actions on the night preceding the finding of the body. Investigation of his statement by the police, however, developed discrepancies, they say. He is kept in solitary confinement on a tentative charge of suspicion.

Sentell, who was an acquaintance of the dead girl, told the police that he saw her at Forsythe and Hunter streets with Mullinax at 12:30 o’clock Sunday morning. He said he spoke to her and that the former street car man tipped his hat in response to the salutation.

In the presence of Chief Beavers, Chief of Detectives Lanford, Police Captain Mayo and Detective Black, the clerk and Mullinax were brought face to face. The clerk reiterated his identification. Pointing at the prisoner, he said:

“That is the man who was with the girl last night. I’m positive. There’s no doubt about it.”

“It’s false! It’s a lie!” cried the man accused. “I was at home asleep, and I can prove it.” Continue Reading →

Coroner’s Jury Visits Scene of Murder and Adjourns Without Rendering Verdict

Coroner's Jury Visits Scene of Murder And Adjourns

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday April 28th, 1913

Will Meet Again Wednesday Morning When Witnesses Will Be Examined—Five Hundred People Present When Inquest Was Begun

For an hour Monday morning a jury empaneled by Coroner Paul Donahue [sic] groped through dark basement passageways and first floor rooms in the factory of the National Pencil company hunting for evidence that would aid them in reaching a verdict as to who murdered pretty Mary Phagan. At the end of their hunt the body adjourned. They will meet again Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock to continue their investigation.

Many witnesses who can throw a light on the actual crime, the actions of the dead girl or of the suspects under arrest will be examined then. It is probable, also, that the prisoners now held in jail also will testify.

The jury met at P. J. Bloomfield’s undertaking chapel, 84 South Pryor street, shortly after 10 o’clock. It was composed of these: J. C. Hood, Clarence Langford, Glenn Dewberry, Homer C. Ashford, John Miller and C. Y. Sheets. Mr. Ashford was foreman.

The first official act of the jury was to view the remains of the 14-year-old girl. Behind closed doors the coroner’s talesmen inspected the fatal wounds and bruises on the girl’s body.

No witnesses were called. One or two who had been told by the police to be present when excused and told to report again Wednesday morning. They and many others probably will be heard at that time. Continue Reading →

Strand of Hair in Machine on Second Floor May Be Clew Left by Mary Phagan

Strand of Hair in Machine on Second Floor May Be Clew Left by Mary Phagan 2

1—Mary Phagan’s own handwriting, as shown in her address she wrote for Sunday School teacher. 2—Written by Lee at suggestion of detectives for purpose of comparison. 3—One of notes found in cellar. 4—Also written by Lee at suggestion of detectives.

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

It’s Discovery Leads to Theory That She May Have Been Attacked There and Then Dragged to Factory Basement

The finding of half a dozen strands of hair in the cogs of a steel lathe in the metal room on the second floor of the National Pencil company’s factory and the discovery of blood splotches on the floor, early Monday morning, aroused the belief that this was the scene of the murder of fourteen-year-old Mary Phagan, Sunday morning. There were no other evidences of a death struggle here, but there was little in the room that could have been disturbed by a combat.

The hair is of the same shade as that of the murdered girl.

A cunning effort has been made to conceal the blood stains on the floor by the smearing of some kind of a powder over the surface. A single drop of congealed blood was found, however, by a Journal reporter, and a further investigation revealed more.

In the absence of contradictory evidence, it is now the belief that the girl was killed in this room and her body then dragged in the opening in the first floor, where it was lowered to the basement. This tends to implicate more than one murderer, as the weighed nearly 150 pounds.

CALLED THERE FOR PAY?

Miss Phagan formerly worked in the very room in which she is believed to have met death. She and four other girls were employed there in manufacturing the metal caps which fasten the rubber erasers to the ends of pencils. Continue Reading →

J. M. Gantt is Arrested on His Arrival in Marietta; He Visited Factory Saturday

J. M. Gantt is Arrested on His Arrival in Marietta; He Visited Factory Saturday

Arthur Mullinax, who seems to have established an alibi through statements of friends that he was at home on night of the murder. [Mullinax is the young man said to have been seen with Mary Phagan Saturday night by Edgar Sentell. Sentell was unwavering with his statement on what he had seen. However, Mullinax’s girlfriend came forward and stated that she had been with him that evening and that Mullinax was entirely innocent. — Ed.]

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

Gantt Protests His Innocence, Declaring He Knows Nothing of the Crime — Says He Went to Factory Saturday to Get Pair of Shoes Left There—His Statement is Confirmed by Superintendent Frank

DECLARES HE KNEW MARY PHAGAN BUT HAD NOT HARMED HER

It Is Not Known What Was Purpose of His Visit to Marietta Monday —His Whereabouts Sunday Not Yet Explained —Story of His Arrest and What He Says

J. M. Gantt, who was discharged three weeks ago from the position of bookkeeper at the National Pencil company, was arrested shortly before noon Monday at Marietta in connection with the murder of Mary Phagan.

He is the man for whom the police were searching during Monday morning, but whose name they refused to divulge. He was arrested by Bailiff Hicks, of Marietta, just as he stepped from a street car in which he had come from Atlanta.

Gantt protests his innocence, and says that he knows nothing whatever of the murder of Mary Phagan. He admits having gone to the factory of the National Pencil company on Saturday afternoon for shoes that he had left there, but denies that he returned to the factory or was with Mary Phagan at any time during the day.

Continue Reading →

Police Think Negro Watchman Can Clear Murder Mystery; Four Are Now Under Arrest

Police Think Negro Watchman Can Clear Mystery 1

Mary Phagan [Interestingly, according to testimony given before the Coroner’s Jury by Mary’s boy sweetheart, George W. Epps, Mary had requested that George walk her home from the factory after work a few days before the murder as the superintendent, Leo M. Frank, had a habit of watching for her from the front door, looking suspicious, and winking at her. — Ed.]

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Monday, April 28th, 1913

Developments in Case Have Come Thick and Fast Monday but No Evidence Has Yet Been Developed Which Fixes the Atrocious Crime — Mullinax Seems to Have Proved Alibi

SUPERINTENDENT FRANK AIDS POLICE IN TRYING TO SOLVE THE MYSTERY

He Was Closely Questioned for Several Hours Monday but Left Headquarters in Company With His Attorneys and Friends—Crime Was Committed in Metal Room on Second Floor—Sleeping Compartment Found in Factory Basement

Detectives expect to wring the secret of Mary Phagan’s murder from Newt Lee, negro night watchman at the National Pencil factory, 37-39 South Forsyth street.

Their theory is that he is innocent of the crime itself, but that he knows the murderer of the fourteen-year-old girl, and is shielding the man who strangled Mary Phagan with a piece of hempen cord on Saturday and dragged her body into the pitch black cellar of the factory.

The negro will tell nothing, but from him and from J. M. Gantt, the discharged bookkeeper, detectives expect to draw the story of how Mary Phagan was beaten into unconsciousness, assaulted, and then strangled to death.

FOUR ARE UNDER ARREST.

Four men are under arrest: Lee, the negro night watchman; Gantt, who was discharged three weeks ago by the company; Arthur Mullinax, of 62 Poplar street, and Gordon Bailey, a negro elevator boy at the pencil factory.

L. M. Frank, superintendent of the pencil factory, was questioned by the police, and spent the better part of Monday morning at [the] police station. But he was not placed under arrest, and at noon returned home.

An alibi has practically been established for Mullinax by Jim Rutherford, with whom he boarded, and the police have no direct evidence against Gordon Bailey, the elevator boy. Continue Reading →

Three Handwriting Experts Say Negro Wrote the Two Notes Found by Body of Girl

At the top is a photograph of writing done by Newt Lee, the negro night watchman after his arrest. At the bottom is a photograph of two lines of a note found beside the body of Mary Phagan in the pencil factory cellar. Three handwriting experts—Frank M. Berry, assistant cashier of the Fourth National bank; Andrew M. Bergstrom, assistant cashier of the Third National bank and

At the top is a photograph of writing done by Newt Lee, the negro night watchman after his arrest. At the bottom is a photograph of two lines of a note found beside the body of Mary Phagan in the pencil factory cellar. Three handwriting experts—Frank M. Berry, assistant cashier of the Fourth National bank; Andrew M. Bergstrom, assistant cashier of the Third National bank and Pope O. Driver, chief bookkeeper and head of mail departments, of the American National bank, unhesitatingly declare that the same hand penned them both. Detectives are satisfied that Lee knows all about the killing of the girl. The only question in their minds is whether he is alone involved.

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Frank M. Berry, of the Fourth National Bank, Andrew M. Bergstrom of Third National, and Pope C. Driver, of the American National, Examined Notes at Journal’s Request And Found Same Person Wrote Both

ALL THREE ARE EXPERTS AND MADE MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINATIONS

Their Investigation Shows He Wrote Both Notes and Seems to Prove Conclusively That Either the Negro Committed the Crime or Knows Who the Guilty Party Is

Through its own investigations The Atlanta Journal has proven conclusively that Newt Lee, the negro night watchman for the National Pencil company, either himself mistreated and murdered pretty Mary Phagan, or that he knows who committed the crime and is assisting the perpetrator to conceal his identity. Continue Reading →

L. M. Frank, Factory Superintendent, Detained By Police

Leo M. Frank. Superintendent of the National Pencil company, snapped by a Journal photographer on the way to police headquarters. Mr. Frank is not under arrest, but will be a witness at the coroner's inquest.

Leo M. Frank. Superintendent of the National Pencil company, snapped by a Journal photographer on the way to police headquarters. Mr. Frank is not under arrest, but will be a witness at the coroner’s inquest.

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Tuesday, April 29th, 1913

Detectives Building Case on Theory that Frank and Negro Can Clear Mystery

Chief Lanford Believes That Testimony of the Superintendent and Negro Night Watchman May Lead to the Arrest of the Person Guilty of the Atrocious Crime That Has Shocked the Whole City—No Further Arrests Expected Soon

MRS. FRANK IN TEARS AT POLICE STATION WHILE HUSBAND IS UNDER EXAMINATION

Frank Was Confronted by Negro Night Watchman—His Attorney, Luther Z. Rosser, Present at Inquiry, Which Was Conducted by Chief Beavers, Chief Lanford and Detectives Behind Closed Doors—Conference Still in Progress at 2

At 1:35 o’clock Tuesday afternoon Chief of Detectives N. A. Lanford, announced that L. M. Frank, superintendent of the National Pencil company’s factory, where Mary Phagan was found murdered early Sunday morning, would be detained by the police until after the coroner’s inquest. The inquest will be resumed Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock.

Chief Lanford made this statement when he emerged from a conference which had been in progress in his office on the third floor of the police station since shortly after 1 o’clock. Continue Reading →

Saw Mary Phagan on Her Way To Pencil Factory, Says McCoy

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Constitution
August 20th, 1913

M. E. McCoy, of Bolton, who stated that he worked part of the time as a painter and part as a farmer, was put on the stand after McEwen, the motorman. He swore that he saw Mary Phagan on Forsyth street going to the National Pencil factory at a very few minutes after the noon hour of the day she was killed.

Before he had left the stand the defense had made a bitter but unsuccessful effort to break him down and confuse him and Attorney Rosser had asked him something like a hundred questions about the days before he saw the girl.

“Did you know Mary Phagan?” asked Dorsey.

“Yes.”

“Did you see her on April 26, Iast?”

“Yes.”

“Where?”

Continue Reading →