Stenographer in Factory Office on Witness Stand

Stenographer in Factory Office on Witness Stand

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Thursday, May 8th, 1913

Miss Hattie Hall, the stenographer who worked at the National Pencil Factory Saturday morning, April 26, testified as follows:

She lives at 69 Luckie Street and works for the National Pencil Company, in Montag Bros.’ office. Saturday morning, April 26, she went to Montag Bros.’ office on Nelson Street, arriving there at approximately 8 o’clock. She left there between 10:30 and 11. She had talked with Frank over the phone several times during the morning.

“The regular stenographer at the plant was off, I think on account of sickness,” she said, “and I went over to the pencil factory to help Frank out. My work there consisted of acknowledging orders and writing some letters.”

Q. How long would it take to acknowledge one order?—A. I don’t know exactly. Continue Reading →

Frank of Nervous Nature; Says Superintendent Aide

Frank of Nervous Nature Says Superintendent Aide

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Thursday, May 8th, 1913

The inquest was resumed at 2:40. Only a small crowd was present.

Miss Hattie Hall, stenographer for the Pencil Company, was called.

She said she had been connected with the company since December 4.

From a pile of papers taken from the factory records, Miss Hall identified a number that were written by herself. She said she did not think she could identify Frank’s writing. Miss Hall selected eight letters that she had written. She said she didn’t know how long it had taken her to write the letters.

Miss Hall looked at the cash book and the book containing the financial sheets and said there was nothing in them she had done on April 26.

Couldn’t Identify Writing.

Coroner Donehoo did not explain his interrogation of the witness along these lines. He appeared very anxious to know just what work she had done on the day of the murder, and instructed her to be careful in identifying her own writing. Several questions were asked her regarding Frank’s handwriting, but she insisted that she could not identify it. Continue Reading →

Miss Hattie Hall, Stenographer, Left Pencil Factory at Noon

Miss Hattie Hall Stenographer Left Pencil FactoryAnother in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal

Thursday, May 8th, 1913

Miss Hattie Hall, a stenographer, was called to the stand after Quinn was excused.

When Miss Hall was excused, shortly before 12:30 o’clock, she was told to return at 2:30 o’clock, as she probably would be recalled then. Miss Hall’s testimony revealed nothing not already known, and was vague upon a number of points already testified to by others. It bore mainly upon the period when she was in the office of the National Pencil company on the morning of Saturday, April 26. According to her, she was there from about 11 o’clock until noon. She saw nothing of Mary Phagan and could throw no light upon the mystery. The coroner questioned her minutely as to hours and minutes and details of her own actions. Continue Reading →

Police Still Withhold Evidence; Frank To Be Examined on New Lines

Luther Z. Rosser, attorney for Leo M. Frank, who was one of the interested listeners to the testimony presented Thursday at the Coroner's inquest into the death of Mary Phagan.

Luther Z. Rosser, attorney for Leo M. Frank, who was one of the interested listeners to the testimony presented Thursday at the Coroner’s inquest into the death of Mary Phagan.

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian

Thursday, May 8th, 1913

Witnesses Are Quizzed in Detail, but Nothing Important Brought Out. Officials Say They Are Satisfied With Case as It Is Being Developed.

Whatever evidence the police officials may have directly to connect any of the suspects with the killing of Mary Phagan, it was not produced at the early session of the Coroner’s inquest Thursday.

What this evidence is the officials refuse to say—except that they are satisfied with the progress that is being made in unraveling the mystery.

Leo Frank, superintendent of the National Pencil Factory, is expected to be the most important witness of the day.

It is said that an entirely new line of questioning will be taken up.

W. W. (“Boots”) Rogers, former county policeman, and Lemmie Quinn, foreman in the tipping department at the National Pencil Factory, were the principal witnesses. Neither gave testimony that was materially damaging to either Leo M. Frank or Newt Lee, who are being held in connection with the crime.

Rogers was questioned closely of the events of the morning the crime was discovered, and told of taking the officers to the scene in his automobile. Beyond his belief that Frank appeared nervous when he was visited at his home by the detectives, Rogers had no information that appeared to point suspicion in one direction more than another. Continue Reading →