New Audio Book: The American Mercury on Leo Frank – Dorsey’s Closing Arguments, part 2

THIS WEEK WE present the second part of the closing arguments of Solicitor Hugh Dorsey (pictured in a  contemporary newspaper illustration), the prosecutor in the 1913 murder trial of Leo Frank for the slaying of his sweatshop employee Mary Phagan. This prosecution has been presented in the major media as a case of “anti-Semitism” — but a reading of the Continue Reading →

New Audio Book: The American Mercury on Leo Frank – Frank’s Trial, Week Four

TODAY our audio book of the American Mercury’s coverage of the 1913 trial and conviction of Jewish sex killer Leo Frank moves into the fourth exciting week of the trial, in which the defense brought forth young female witnesses who claimed that Frank had never made improper sexual advances toward them, rebutted by the defense with young female witnesses of their Continue Reading →

Detective Chief Tells Grand Jury of “Third Degree”

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. The Atlanta Constitution Sunday, June 15, 1913 Questions Put to Lanford Indicate That Investigation of Police Methods Is Being Conducted. TORTURE ERA IS PAST, CHIEF INFORMS JURY Science and Skill Now Employed by Detectives in Securing Confessions From Criminals, He Says. The police “third degree,” Continue Reading →

Police Hold Conley By Court’s Order

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Wednesday, June 11th, 1913 Judge Roan Gives Suspect Chance to Show Why He Should Not Be Released. The Phagan case took a queer turn Wednesday afternoon when Judge Roan, apparently stirred by Luther Z. Rosser’s ar[r]aignment of the way Jim Conley has been Continue Reading →

Fair Play Alone Can Find Truth in Phagan Puzzle, Declares Old Reporter

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Sunday, June 8th, 1913 Average Atlantan Believes Frank is Guilty, but That Little Real Evidence Has Yet Pointed to Him as Slayer. Stirring Defense by Wife and Attack on Solicitor Dorsey Are Two Striking Features of Week’s Progress in Case. by AN OLD Continue Reading →

Current in Effect on Day of Tragedy

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Constitution Saturday, June 7th, 1913 Report That Elevator in Pencil Factory Was Not Running Proves Groundless. Following a widely-prevalent rumor that Leo Frank’s defense will strive to prove that the current was shut off from the pencil factory plant on the day Mary Phagan Continue Reading →

“Torture Chamber” Methods Charged in Getting Evidence

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Journal Saturday, June 7th, 1913 In Card to The Journal, Wife of Factory Superintendent Declares Solicitor Dorsey Has Approved Third Degree “WE ARE SUFFERING NOW, BUT WHO WILL BE NEXT?” Her Statement in Full—Conley Will Not Be Indicted as Accessory, but if Frank is Continue Reading →

Grand Jury Probes Detective “Leaks”

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Constitution Friday, June 6th, 1913 Court Officials Worried Over News Growing Out of the Phagan Murder Mystery. It is understood on good authority that the grand jury has been called upon to make a searching investigation in the apparent “leakage” in the detective department, Continue Reading →

Report Negro Found Who Saw Phagan Attack

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Friday, June 6th, 1913 St. Louis, June 6.—That a negro, who is alleged to have said he witnessed the murder of Mary Phagan in Atlanta, is under arrest in Cairo, Ill., and is about to be returned to Atlanta by a Pinkerton detective, Continue Reading →

Conley Sticks to His Story; Declares Detective Chief

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Journal Friday, June 6th 1913 Report of a Confession, Different From One Given to the Detectives, Is Ridiculed by Chief Lanford DORSEY MAKES REPLY TO MRS. L. M. FRANK No More News of Phagan Case to Be Given to Newspapers Except Through Head of Continue Reading →

Dorsey Replies to the Charges of Mrs. L. Frank

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Constitution Friday, June 6th, 1913 Says the Wife of an Accused Man Would Be the Last to Learn of Her Husband’s Guilt. MRS. FRANK BITTER IN HER CRITICISM Detective Department Not at All Disturbed Over Denial of the McKnight Woman That She Signed Affidavit. Continue Reading →

Cook Repudiates Entire Affidavit Police Possess

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Thursday, June 5th, 1913 Utter repudiation of the affidavits which she was alleged to have sworn to incriminating conversations in the home of Leo M. Frank, indicted for the slaying of Mary Phagan, was made Thursday by Minola McKnight, negro cook for the Continue Reading →

‘I Know My Husband is Innocent,’ Asserts Wife of Leo M. Frank

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Thursday, June 5th, 1913 Following the complete denial by Minola McKnight, cook in the household of Leo M. Frank, of the statements she is alleged to have made in the sensational police affidavit given out Wednesday, Mrs. Leo M. Frank Thursday made her Continue Reading →

Negro’s Affidavit Not Given Much Credence

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Journal Thursday, June 5th, 1913 Even the City Detectives, It Is Said, Attach Very Little Importance to Document Very little importance, it is said, is attached by the city detectives to the sensational and incoherent affidavit of Minola McKnight, the negro cook at the Continue Reading →

“My Husband is Innocent,” Declares Mrs. Leo M. Frank In First Public Statement

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Journal Thursday, June 5th, 1913 Wife of Accused Pen[c]il Factory Superintendent Arraigns Solicitor General Dorsey for What She Terms the Torturing of Witnesses Into Making Desired Affidavits—Says Treatment of Her Negro Cook by Solicitor and Detectives Taxed Patience DECLARES MR. FRANK’S DEMEANOR HAS ALWAYS Continue Reading →

Frank Wanted Gun to Take His Life, Says Negro Cook

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Constitution Thursday, June 5th, 1913 Sensational Affidavit Made for the Police by Minola McKnight, Servant in Leo Frank’s Home. Fully as startling as the recent confession of James Conley, an affidavit purporting to have been sworn to by Minola McKnight, the servant girl of Continue Reading →

Cook Is Released on Signing Paper

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Journal Wednesday, June 4th, 1913 Minola McKnight, the negro cook at the home of Leo M. Frank, was released from custody by the police late Tuesday afternoon, after she had signed the sensational affidavit now in the possession of the detective department. The woman Continue Reading →

Frank’s Cook Was Counted Upon as Defense Witness

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Wednesday, June 4th, 1913 While police activities have been turned to this line of investigation, the negro sweeper, Jim Conley, has been given a rest. Chief of Detectives Lanford stated that the negro would be quizzed no more. Cook Counted on by Defense. Continue Reading →

Servant of Frank is Liberated After Long Examination

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Constitution Wednesday, June 4th, 1913 Despite Gruelling Third Degree, Woman Maintains Denial of Having Told Conflicting Stories. FACED BY HUSBAND, SHE CONTRADICTS HIM Her Release Came After Her Attorney Had Threatened to Take Out Habeas Corpus Proceedings. Minola McKnight, the servant girl held in Continue Reading →

Cook’s Sensational Affidavit

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case. Atlanta Georgian Wednesday, June 4th, 1913 Says She Heard Frank’s Wife Tell Mother Frank Had Threatened Suicide Incoherent Statement by Employee of Frank Household That Must Not Be Taken as Legal Evidence Until Heard and Corroborated in Court. Another sensational but strangely incoherent affidavit in Continue Reading →