Frank Jurors Idle Away Long Hours With Song

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal
July 30th, 1913

They Sing Ballads and Tell Irish Tales During the “Recess” Hours

Jurors in the Frank trial have organized a singing club. Their purpose is not to give diversity to the trial with a note of song, but to while away the time between sessions of court.

When Judge L. S. Roan gives word that the trial has proce[e]ded far enough for the day, jurors are taken for a brief, brisk walk, and then to their residence for the nonce, which consists in three rooms thrown together at the Kimball house.

There the twelve take up their quarters for the night, and remain until the beginning of the court session upon the next day. Twelve cots have been placed in the three connecting rooms, and there the twelve jurors sleep. Until the trial is ended they will have no opportunity of seeing home folks, but they are permitted to send messages through deputy sheriffs.

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96 Men are Called Before Getting Jury

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Constitution
July 29th, 1913

Attorneys for Both Sides Had Good Line on All Men Examined.

According to an unofficial account kept as the matter of striking the Frank jury was carried out, ninety-six men were called into the box and examined before the twelve men to try the case were finally selected. These men were divided into eight panels of twelve each, and came in a panel at a time.

Every bit of information that could be got together in advance about the men whose names were on the venire list of 144 men drawn last week, had been secured by lawyers on both sides, who also had outside aid in selecting the men.

A crowd of men who will take no other part in the legal fight surrounded the lawyers’ tables and gave suggestions as the various names were called. Among them were Oscar Simmons, of counsel for the Georgia Railway and Power company, which has practically the best and most complete list of the 6,000 men whose names are in the Fulton county jury list. Mr. Simmons aided the defense.

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Burglars Try to Enter Home of Frank Juror

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Constitution
July 29th, 1913

But F. V. L. Smith’s Wife Calls Police and Intruders Flee.

Two big, burly, black negroes who evidently had taken a decided interest in the Frand [sic] murder trial, and knew that F. V. L. Smith, of 481 Cherokee avenue, had been chosen for the jury yesterday and would not be home last night, attempted to enter his home.

No one was there but Mrs. Smith and her little 4-weeks’ old child. Seeing the negroes on the porch, she made a step toward them, and they fled. Within a few minutes they returned, and instead of fainting as most women would have done, she coolly walked to the phone and called the police station.

Call Officer Shumate answered the ring, and with his partner, Officer Cochran, the two made the trip to record-breaking time, getting out there in four minutes by the clock, but the burglars were gone.

Jurors in Leo M. Frank Case Must Answer Four Questions

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Constitution
July 28th, 1913

Chief interest in the case of Leo M. Frank, which is scheduled to begin today, centers in the selection of a jury, the first 144 veniremen, having been drawn last Thursday and published in The Constitution on Sunday.

It seems to be the general opinion that this panel will be exhausted and others summoned before a jury is secured. Attorneys for both sides are of the opinion that it will take about a day to select a jury, which would let the hearing of evidence begin on Tuesday, or on Wednesday, if it should happen that the task becomes so difficult as to consume two days.

Many Are Disqualified.

Owing to the universal interest in the developments growing out of the murder of little Mary Phagan in the National Pencil factory, many men have disqualified themselves from serving on the jury through an expression of their opinion as to the guilt or innocence of the prisoner at the bar today.

The veniremen who will appear in court this morning will be asked to answer four questions, prescribed by the code of Georgia as follows:

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Leo Frank’s Trial on Murder Charge Booked for Today

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Constitution
July 28th, 1913

Judge L. S. Roan Announces That He Will Call Case at Nine O’Clock This Morning.

LAWYERS BELIEVE JURY WILL BE NAMED IN DAY

Legal Representatives Take Good Rest on Sunday in Preparation for Struggle That Begins Today.

After weeks of preparation by some of the most skilled legal minds in the state and after every point in the affair that has been made public has been discussed and threshed out by thousands of citizens, the case of the state v. Leo M. Frank, charged with the murder of little Mary Phagan, will be called at 9 o’clock today.

Event after event has followed in rapid succession since the morning of April 27, when Atlanta arose to wend its way to church and read of the finding by police of the little girl’s dead body in the basement of the National Pencil company, on South Forsyth street. Newt Lee, the negro night watchman, who called the police, was arrested, and is still held. J. M. Gantt and Arthur Mullinax, two white employees, were then arrested, and afterwards freed. Then the young factory superintendent was taken into custody.

Then Conley’s Affidavit.

Then came the arrest of James Conley, negro sweeper, who stayed in jail apparently unheeded until he burst forth with his sensational affidavits against the superintendent.

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State Opens Its Case Against Leo M. Frank

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal
July 28th, 1913

JURY COMPLETED BEFORE RECESS AND STATE WAS READY TO BEGIN INTRODUCTION OF ITS TESTIMONY

Last Man In the Last Panel Was Accepted as the Twelfth Juror and Cleared the Way for the Actual Trial of the Case When Court Reconvened at 3 o’Clock—Newt Lee Will Probably Be the First Witness Placed on the Stand

BOTH THE STATE AND DEFENSE SEEMED SATISFIED WITH TWELVE MEN CHOSEN TO TRY IMPORTANT CASE

Proceeding During the Morning More Like That of a Civil Than a Criminal Case—Court Room Crowded, but Not Uncomfortable—Frank Appears in Court, Showing No Sign of Worry—Full Story of the Morning Session

Sidebar:

PERSONNEL OF FRANK JURY; ALL MARRIED EXCEPT ONE

With one exception the jurors for the Frank trial are married men and five are fathers. Among them is one bank teller, one bookkeeper, one real estate agent, one manufacturer, one contractor, one optician, one claim agent, one mailing clerk, two salesmen and two machinists.

The following are the jurors:

M. Johemmings, married, foreman at 271 Marietta street, residence 161 Jones avenue

M. L. Woodward, married and father of two children, salesman at King Hardware company. He resides at 182 Clark street.

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Frank Jury

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian
July 28th, 1913

Here is the Frank jury complete:

A. H. Henslee, 74 Oak street; salesman.

F. V. L. Smith, 481 Cherokee avenue, manufacturer’s agent.

J. F. Higdon, 108 Ormewood avenue.

F. E. Winburn, 213 Lucile avenue, claim agent.

A. L. Wisbey, 31 Hood street, cashier of the Buckeye Oil Company.

W. M. Jeffries, a real estate man, with offices at 318 Empire building.

Marcellus Johemming, 161 James street, a machine shop foreman with offices at 281 Marietta street.

M. L. Woodward, cashier King Hardware Company, 182 Park avenue.

J. T. Osburn, an optician for A. K. Hawkes, was chosen from the fifth panel to be the ninth juror.

D. Townsend, 84 Whitehall Terrace, cashier Central Bank and Trust Corporation, tenth juror.

W. S. Medcalf, 136 Kirkwood avenue, circulation man.

C. J. Bosshardt, pressman, employed by Foote & Davies, 216 Bryan street.

Jury Complete to Try Frank

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian
July 28th, 1913

Wife Helps Prisoner Pick Men to Try Him

All in Readiness for Real Trial to Begin After Short Recess

Events on the opening day of the trial of Leo M. Frank, accused of the slaying of Mary Phagan in the National Pencil Factory, moved with such unexpected swiftness that it was apparent that the trial proper would be under way and the first witnesses called before the close of the first day’s session. The jury had been completed by the time recess was taken at 1:30.

After a few preliminary clashes between the opposing attorneys which presaged a bitter struggle when the fight for Frank’s life actually was begun, the court settled down to the selection of the jury. The whole morning session up to the recess was occupied with the examination of veniremen.

All the force of attorneys at the table for the defense watched with keen eyes every man examined and frequently referred to a voluminous r[e]cord containing the names of all the veniremen and detailed statements of their history and associations so far as these might have a bearing on their desirability as jurors to pass on Leo Frank’s guilt or innocence.

The keenest interest was manifested by those in the crowded little courtroom as the strategies of the brilliant lawyers were revealed during the examination.

State Had Veniremen’s Records.

The thoroughness with which the Solicitor and his assistants had canvassed the history of every venireman and had investigated whether or not he had ever expressed an opinion on the guilt or innocence of the accused was demonstrated when W. W. Hemmett, a salesman for the Kingsbury Shoe Company, was being examined as to his qualifications.

“Have you ever said you thought Frank was guilty?” Mr. Dorsey inquired.

“No, I never have,” replied Hemmett.

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Leo M. Frank Will Go to Trial Monday, It Is Now Believed

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Journal
July 27th, 1913

Indications Were Saturday Night That the Trial Would Begin Before Judge Roan at Hour Scheduled

BOTH SIDES READY AND BITTER FIGHT IS CERTAIN

Many Well Known Citizens In Venire From Whom the Twelve Jurors Will Be Chosen for Trial

If both sides answer ready when the clerk “sounds” the case of the “State of Georgia versus Leo M. Frank” in the criminal division of the superior court at 9 o’clock Monday morning, what is expected to be the most brilliant as well as one of the most bitter legal fights in the criminal history of the state will have commenced.

The stage has been set for the trial, and on the eve of the battle there was no intimation from any one in authority that the trial would not actually be commenced. For weeks the state and defense have been preparing for the struggle, which is to come Monday, and only an extraordinary motion from the defense, which is not now expected, will delay the trial.

Leo M. Frank, Cornell graduate and man of education and refinement, is charged with the murder of Mary Phagan, a fourteen-year-old factory girl, whose lifeless body was found in the basement of the National Pencil factory, of which he is superintendent, on April 27 by a negro night watchman.

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Venire Whipped Into Shape Rapidly; Negro Is Eligible

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian (Hearst’s Sunday American)
July 27th, 1913

Within a minute or two after Deputy Sheriff Plennie Minor had called the court to order the examination process was applied to the venire panel of 144 men. From each panel of twelve one or more men were excused after being asked the formal questions and furnished a sufficient reason to bar them.

J. H. Jones, Deputy Clerk, called the names. F. W. Stone, No. 82 East Linden street, was excused on account of illness. R. F. Shedden was refused on an excuse of military exemption. Only one man was excused from the first twelve men.

H. R. Calloway, of No. 691 Piedmont avenue, first of the second panel, was not served. F. A. Hull, No. 180 Grant street, was excused on account of his age, 20 years. T. J. Henderson, No. 25 Woodson street, was excused as opposed to capital punishment. J. A. McCreary, No. 78 East North street, was excused because of his residence in Dekalb County, J. F. Patterson, of College Park, was excused on account of deafness. Five were excused from the second panel.

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Frank Watches Closely as the Men Who are to Decide Fate are Picked

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian (Hearst’s Sunday American)
July 27th, 1913

This newspaper article is a continuation from the first page of an Atlanta Georgian newspaper. The first page is missing from our archives. If any readers know where to obtain the first part of this article, we would appreciate any help! Thank you!

[…] Mary Phagan by strangulation. This was followed by the request of the defense that the State’s witnesses be called, sworn and put under the rule.

The prosecution opened by announcing its readiness to go on with the trial and called the list of witnesses. Bailiffs brought them down from the second floor. In regular order called, their names were: Mrs. J. W. Coleman, mother of Mary Phagan; J. W. Coleman, the girl’s stepfather; George Epps, newsboy; L. S. Dobbs, policeman; W. W. Rogers, bailiff for constable; L. S. Starnes, detective and also prosecutor on the indictment; Pat Campbell, detective; Grace Hicks, girl who identified Mary Phagan’s body; J. M. Gantt, once held for inquiry, now supposed, to be a star witness for the prosecution; Harry Scott, the Pinkerton detective; R. P. Barrett, pencil factory employee; B. P. Haslett, policeman; M. [sic] V. Darley, factory employee; W. A. Gheesling, undertaker that cared for the girl’s body; Dr. Claude Smith, City Bacteriologist; Dr. H. F. Harris, member of the State Board of Health; Dr. J. W. Hurt, Coroner’s physician; E. L. Parry, court stenographer; E. S. Smith, Monteen Stover, girl employee at pencil factory; Minola McKnight, cook at Frank’s home; Albert McKnight, Minola’s husband (McKnight did not appear in court); Helen Ferguson, Mrs. Arthur White, wife of factory employee, and L. Stanford.

Agree on Conley Affidavits.

Attorney Reuben Arnold asked concerning the duces tecum that he had served on the State’s attorneys for the affidavits of Jim Conley and others. On the promise of Solicitor Dorsey that he would produce the affidavits whenever needed the duces tecum was waived.

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Work of Choosing Jury for Trial of Frank Difficult

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

Atlanta Georgian (Hearst’s Sunday American)
July 27th, 1913

Veniremen Searchingly Examined by Both State and Defense

Slightest Objection Used to Disqualify—Attorneys Shrewdly Gauge Candidates from Every Angle.

In the selection of the twelve men to comprise the jury which will try Leo M. Frank for the murder of Mary Phagan, one of the bitterest contests of the great legal battle which begins Monday is anticipated.

That counsel for both the defense and State will probe deep into the character of each of the men drawn from the venire of 144 who take the stand for examination for jury service in this case is certain. The attorneys will endeavor to unearth in the character of the prospective juryman such traits as they may believe favorable or unfavorable to their case.

The slightest objection will be used to disqualify the man from becoming a member of the deciding tribunal. Under the cross-examination of such skilled lawyers as those who will appear in the Phagan case no iota of information which will tend to sway the verdict will remain concealed to to be carried into the jury box and fight against the delivery of justice.

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