Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 23

William Smith, “volunteer” attorney for James Conley, who later alleged he had had a change of heart and believed Conley to be guilty.

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

ATTORNEY WILLIAM SMITH traded his “free” services as a lawyer for James Conley for the influence of an agent of the William Burns detective agency, Dan Lehon, in an unrelated abduction case — illustrating either extreme naïveté or weak legal ethics on Smith’s part. Smith’s defection from advocate for Conley to accusing him of murder is a very strange about-face. But sudden about-faces abound in the Leo Frank case, especially involving people 1) who had strong evidence against Leo Frank, and 2) who subsequently had close contact with agents of the William Burns agency, who were working for Frank.

In this, the twenty-third audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we will also learn of the shameless abuse of the family and legacy of Judge Leonard Roan, who two years earlier had presided over Frank’s trial. Judge Roan was visited on his deathbed by Leo Frank’s attorneys, who, shortly after the judge’s death, produced an alleged letter from him saying he believed Frank innocent and deserved a new trial — precisely what Frank’s attorneys were trying to achieve at the time. Both internal evidence in the letter itself — and statements from Judge Roan’s own family — indicate that the letter is a forgery.

 

This new audio book, based on the Nation of Islam’s The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, the best investigative effort made on the Leo Frank case in the last 100 years, will take you on a trip into the past — to the greatest American murder mystery of all time; a mystery that will reveal to you the hidden forces that shape our world even today. Continue Reading →

Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 22

There is no doubt that Mary Phagan’s body was dragged from the elevator to where it was found in front of the furnace.

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

ONE OF the weirdest aspects of the Leo Frank case was the — shall we say — strained effort of the Frank team to make some human excrement found in the National Pencil Company elevator shaft into a “proof” that Leo Frank was innocent of murdering Mary Phagan. This so-called “shit in the shaft” theory was based on the overwhelming fear of the Frank defense that the use of that elevator to move Mary’s body — evidenced by dragging marks in the basement’s dirt floor leading from the elevator to precisely where the body was found — was too damning for their client, since only Frank had a key to the elevator. The theory they crafted was that the excrement was deposited at the bottom of the shaft before the murder by James Conley, but was “crushed for the first time” when the detectives visited the basement after the murder — therefore, they claimed, the elevator could not have been used to move Mary’s body.

 

The “shit in the shaft” tale was used by Governor John Slaton as one of his reasons for commuting Frank’s sentence in 1915.

In this, the twenty-second audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we will see how Continue Reading →

Mincey Story Declared Vital To Both Sides in Frank Case

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Georgian

Sunday, July 20, 1913

By AN OLD POLICE REPORTER.

The most important and interesting development of the week in the Phagan case was the Mincey affidavit, directing suspicion more surely in the direction of James Conley than ever before, if the affidavit is that of a credible witness.

If what Mincey says is true—if his evidence can be made to “stand up” in court—then he is far and away not only the most important witness yet discovered, but his testimony will serve to clear up the mysterious Phagan case in its most obscure phases.

Solicitor General Hugh Dorsey has attacked Mincey’s credibility. Naturally, he would do that.

If Mincey is worthy of belief and is speaking the truth, he has dealt the State’s case against Frank a deadly blow, from which it can not hope to recover.

If he does not speak the truth, and that can be established, it will redound fo [sic] the hurt of the defense, for it will have a bracing-up effect upon Conley’s other story.

But Who Is Mincey?

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Counsel of Frank Says Dorsey Has Sought to Hide Facts

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Georgian

Sunday, July 20, 1913

Attorneys Rosser and Arnold, in a Statement to the Press, Make Bitter Attack on Solicitor for His Conduct of Phagan Case.

Call Attention to Secrecy Maintained by Prosecution, and Declare Action of State’s Attorney Has Inflamed Public Opinion.

Luther Z. Rosser and Reuben R. Arnold, attorneys for Leo M. Frank, who will be tried July 29 on the charge of killing Mary Phagan, joined Saturday in a bitter attack upon the policy of Solicitor Hugh M. Dorsey, whose procedure in the case, they said, had inflamed public opinion and had placed the Solicitor far below the dignity of his office.

In a formal statement, they charged that Dorsey had ignored his constitutional and legal functions and had sought to usurp those of the Grand Jury by his attempt to block the indictment of Jim Conley by that body.

They described his action as unprecedented and dangerous in the extreme, and represented Dorsey and Conley as partners in “a harmonious concert.”

The document, which is one of the few public statements issued by the defense, is bristling with criticism of the Solicitor’s conduct throughout the investigation of the murder mystery, and charges that Dorsey has maintained his belief in Frank’s guilt apparently for no other purpose than to convict Frank.

Call Attention to Secrecy.

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Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 21

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

THE “death notes” left beside Mary Phagan’s body when she was murdered in 1913 have been the subject of endless speculation. Were the notes written by James Conley at the direction of Mary’s convicted killer, Leo Frank? — or were they Conley’s creation alone? — or were they purpose-written by Frank, using Conley’s writing as a guide, in order to throw suspicion away from the real killer and onto a Black man?

 

In this, the twenty-first audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we will learn what handwriting experts say about the notes, and we will also learn how the historical record has been distorted by Leo Frank partisans such as author Steve Oney.

This new audio book, based on the Nation of Islam’s The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, the best investigative effort made on the Leo Frank case in the last 100 years, will take you on a trip into the past — to the greatest American murder mystery of all time; a mystery that will reveal to you the hidden forces that shape our world even today.

To read all the chapters we’ve published so far, simply click on this link.

We at The American Mercury are now proud to present part 21 of our audio version of this very important book, read by Vanessa Neubauer.

Simply press “play” on the player embedded above — or at the end of this article — to hear part 21 of the book.

* * *

Click here to obtain a print or e-book copy of this important work, The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, Vol. 3; The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man.

For further information on the Nation of Islam Historical Research Group, readers are encouraged to visit their Web site, noirg.org.

 

Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 20

The death notes found near Mary Phagan’s body – click for high resolution

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

ONE OF the most mysterious aspects of the Leo Frank case is the series of “death notes,” four of which were written, according to testimony, but only two of which were ever found. They were discovered right next to the dead body of Frank’s victim, 13-year-old Mary Phagan. If taken at face value, they appear as though they were written by Mary while she was being assaulted. But they also are written in an approximation of the African-American vernacular of that time and in a semi-literate style that Mary Phagan would have been extremely unlikely to use. Were they written by a Black killer, in a hopelessly botched attempt to throw investigators off the trail? Or were they created by a clever killer to make us think that the murderer was a Black man? Were they perhaps even dictated by the killer to a compliant Black man to write, who would thereby impose his genuine style — and handwriting — on them? (ILLUSTRATION: Two of the four murder notes — the other two were never found.)

In this, the twentieth audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we also learn that the latter scenario — with Leo Frank dictating the notes to James Conley — is exactly what Conley said actually happened. Much has been made by Frank partisans of the fact that Conley’s language on the stand more or less matched the style and usage of the notes, claiming that this rules out Frank having dictated them. But that claim has little merit, for it seems very unlikely that Frank would want to dictate the notes word for word: Allowing Conley to put them in his own words and style would have served Frank’s purpose much better. We’ll also learn of the glaring weaknesses of Frank’s other alibis, many of which appear to have been hastily and sloppily cobbled together at the last minute.

 

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Prison System of Georgia Attacked by Episcopalians

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Constitution

Sunday, July 20, 1913

The Episcopalian diocese of Georgia, at its annual convention, appointed a social service commission, which has since met and formulated the following special report on prison and child labor conditions in this state.

“Resolved, That the prison system of the state of Georgia, and the methods of punishment now in use and as commonly administered, are unworthy of an enlightened and progressive state.

“Resolved, That we hereby indorse the splendid efforts of the Prison Reform association of this state, and offer to them our hearty co-operation in securing needed reforms.

“Resolved, That we send copies of these resolutions to as many members of our legislature as possible, and urge them to support those bills now pending which bear on the subject of prison reform in the state of Georgia and which are advocated by the prison association.

“Resolved, That we also urge upon our representatives their support of the child labor bill, advocated and indorsed by the National Child Labor association.”

Copies of these resolutions are being mailed to the legislators, and many of them have already expressed themselves strongly in favor of the measures reerred [sic] to. The three general prison reform measures have already been recommended for passage by the house committee. They are the bill to legalize the suspension of sentence and appoint probation officers; the bill to establish a home for wayward girls; the bill providing for jail inspections and enlarging the powers and responsibilities of the prison commission.

The chairman of the commission which formulated the above report is Rev. G.S. Whitney, of Augusta. The commission is authorized to represent the Episcopal church in the southeastern section of the state in all esforts [sic] for social betterment. It represents some 5,000 communicants or about 7,500 baptized members of the Episcopal church residing in the southeastern half of the state of Georgia.

Colonel G.A. Gordon and Miss Helen Pendleton, of Savannah, are among the prominent members of the commission.

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The Atlanta Constitution, July 20th 1913, “Prison System of Georgia Attacked by Episcopalians,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Grim Justice Pursues Mary Phagan’s Slayer

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Constitution

Sunday, July 20, 1913

As Famous Murder Case Nears Trial the Public Mind Again Reverts to the Discovery of the Crime; and Again the Great Question Comes Up:

“What Happened in the Pencil Factory Between Noon Saturday and 3:15 Sunday Morning?”

By Britt Craig.

Automobile in which detectives and newspaper men went to the scene of the murder. In the machine are Detective Starnes, Harry Scott, W. W. (Boots) Rogers and John Black.

There are things that happen right before our eyes that defy the pen of a god to describe. The mind of a master would find itself lamentably incompetent, and the words of a Demosthenes would become panic-stricken in the attempt.

One of these was the night Mary Phagan’s body was found. It was a night as dramatic as the fury of a queen and poignant as her sorrow. It wrote the first thrilling chapter of Atlanta’s greatest criminal case, and it will live forever in the minds of those who knew it.

This story is no effort at description, because description is impossible. It is just a plain, ordinary story of the happenings that night when Newt Lee went down into the basement to wash his hands and emerged, overcome with fear, the discoverer of a crime that put an entire state in mourning.

A week from tomorrow, Leo Frank, manager of the pencil factory, where Mary Phagan’s body was found, will be placed on trial charged with the murder of the young girl, and interest in this mysterious crime again goes back to the night when Newt Lee startled police headquarters with news of his grewsome find.

Finding the Body.

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Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 19

James Conley

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

THE TESTIMONY of Black men and women was pivotal in the trial of Leo M. Frank for the murder of Mary Phagan, and was so regarded by both the prosecution and defense. But little-heralded then, or now, is the horribly bad treatment these Black witnesses repeatedly received. The prosecution often “sweated” or gave Black witnesses “the Third Degree” — which meant physically or verbally threatening or abusing them, with the idea being that only under such severe fear would Black people tell the truth. Even the man on trial, the man the prosecution said was guilty of murder, Leo M. Frank, never received treatment even remotely like this from the police, the detectives, or the prosecutor’s office. Leo Frank partisans, for their part, strove mightily to frame two Black men, Newt Lee and Jim Conley, with planted “evidence” and hired perjury, and at one point even solicited the murder of James Conley, the Black man whose testimony against Frank was among the most important in the case.

 

In this, the nineteenth audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we also learn of the highly improbable claims of the Frank defense, including Leo Frank’s bizarre claim on the stand that he had “unconsciously” used the toilet at the very location and time at which Mary Phagan was being strangled to death — incidentally leaving his valuable papers and payroll unguarded in an unlocked, open office in an unlocked building.

This new audio book, based on the Nation of Islam’s The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, the best investigative effort made on the Leo Frank case in the last 100 years, will take you on a trip into the past — to the greatest American murder mystery of all time; a mystery that will reveal to you the hidden forces that shape our world even today.

To read all the chapters we’ve published so far, simply click on this link.

We at The American Mercury are now proud to present part 19 of our audio version of this very important book, read by Vanessa Neubauer.

Simply press “play” on the player embedded above — or at the end of this article — to hear part 19 of the book.

* * *

Click here to obtain a print or e-book copy of this important work, The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, Vol. 3; The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man.

For further information on the Nation of Islam Historical Research Group, readers are encouraged to visit their Web site, noirg.org.

 

Mrs. Nina Formby Will Not Return for Trial

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Constitution

Sunday, July 20, 1913

Woman Swore That Leo M. Frank Tried to Engage Room on Night of Murder

Mrs. Nina Formby, who signed an affidavit in the Frank case in which she swore the superintendent has endeavored to engage a room at her house, 400 Piedmont avenue, during the Phagan murder night to which he might bring a girl has fled to Chattanooga and will not appear at the coming trial on July 28. This announcement was made to a Constitution reporter last night by the woman’s legal representative, John Gossett. Gossett states that she is fearful of facing cross examination on some phases of her story.

A letter has been placed on file in Gossett’s office in which the Formby woman asks for a continuance of a trial in which she will be arraigned before a justice court. August or September are the months to which she asks the case be put. The letter says that she will not be in Atlanta until that time. She has obtained a position in the Tennessee city, she says, and intends making Chattanooga her future home.

At first it was intimated that the state would put credence in the affidavit, but on account of the woman’s character it was later considered of but little value.

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The Atlanta Constitution, July 20th 1913, “Mrs. Nina Formby Will Not Return for Trial,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Frank’s Lawyers Score Dorsey for His Stand

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Constitution

Sunday, July 20, 1913

Luther Rosser and Reuben Arnold Declare He Is Going Out of His Way to Dictate to the Grand Jury.

EXCEEDS PROVINCE OF SOLICITOR GENERAL

Grand Jury Will Meet at 10 O’Clock Monday Morning to Take Up Conley Case. Call Is Sent Out.

In reply to Solicitor General Hugh M. Dorsey’s statements in regard to the proposed indictment by the grand jury of James Conley, the negro who has confessed complicity in the murder of Mary Phagan, Attorneys Reuben R. Arnold and Luther Z. Rosser issued a statement Saturday afternoon in which they openly attacked the stand taken by the solicitor in protesting against the indictment of the negro.

That the solicitor is exceeding his legal functions as a state officer is one point that the lawyers defending Leo M. Frank make in their statement, and they also severely criticise the solicitor for his detective work in the Phagan murder.

The card also contains a reference to the statement made in The Constitution Saturday morning by Attorney William M. Smith, representing the negro Conley. The card of the Frank defense takes Attorney Smith to task for rushing to the aid of the solicitor.

Solicitor General Dorsey also issued a statement in which he declared that he no more believed that the grand jury, when it meets Monday, would indict James Conley than he believes that Judge J.T. Pendleton will accede to the request of Frank attorneys to draw the venire for the trial jury from the box containing names of grand jury veniremen.

Roan Out of City.

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Jury Is Determined to Consider a Bill Against Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Journal

Saturday, July 19, 1913

Protest of Solicitor Fails to Stop Session to Consider Phagan Evidence on Monday

DORSEY STILL BELIEVES JURY WON’T INDICT

Solicitor Says Frank Defense Wants Jury to Try Him Drawn From the Grand Jury List

Grand Jurors Who Will Consider Conley’s Case

This is the Fulton county grand jury which has been called to meet Monday over the protest of the solicitor to take up the case of Jim Conley, the negro sweeper at the National Pencil factory:
W.D. Beatie, foreman.
T.C. Whitner.
John S. Spalding.
W.C. Carroll, East Point.
H.B. Ferguson.
Garnet McMillan, East Point.
Edward H. Inman.
A.W. Farlinger.
M.A. Fall.
Julius M. Skinner.
Oscar Elsas.
George Bancroft.
W.H. Glenn.
S.E. McConnell.
Thomas J. Buchanan.
Sameuel A. Carson.
Eugene Oberdorfer.
A.Q. Adams.
W.O. Stamps.
W.T. Ashford.

There are only twenty citizens on the grand jury which has been called to meet Monday by Foreman W.D. Beattie to consider indicting James Conley, the negro sweeper, for the murder of Mary Phagan.

Continue Reading →

Natural Crank, Mayor’s Shot at Broyles

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Georgian

Saturday, July 19, 1913

“Dyspeptic, Fanatic, Stoneheart, Monomaniac” Are Other Terms in “Final” Retort.

Mayor Woodward Saturday said he was finally dismissing Recorder Nash R. Broyles from his mind with the statement:

“He is a natural dyspeptic, crank and a fanatic. If he ever had a heart it was turned to stone. Therefore, it is natural that he should become a monomaniac over the subject of using his czar-like authority in his own petty sphere. I don’t care anything more about him.”

Mayor Woodward again went over the head of Recorder Broyles Friday when he reduced the sentence of George Poulos, a restaurant keeper on Alabama street, who had been fined $100 and sentenced to 30 days in the Stockade fo [sic] violating the prohibition law.

The Mayor said he was much surprised that the Recorder did not make the fine $49 and the sentence 29 days so as to stay outside the jurisdiction of the Mayor.

It was expected that Mayor Woodward would issue a full pardon but he didn’t. He just reduced the fine to $49 and the sentence to 29 days.

* * *

The Atlanta Georgian, July 19th 1913, “Natural Crank, Mayor’s Shot at Broyles,” Leo Frank case newspaper article series (Original PDF)

Dorsey Resists Move to Indict Jim Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Georgian

Saturday, July 19, 1913

GRAND JURY SPLIT BY LATEST MOVE

Public Opinion Forces Consideration of Move to Indict Conley for Phagan Slaying.

Solicitor Dorsey is fighting vigorously the movement in the Grand Jury to indict Jim Conley Monday for the murder of Mary Phagan, despite the bombardment of letters from many citizens and by the sentiment of some of its own members.

It is for the consideration of these letters and petitions, asking the reopening of the Phagan matter, that the meeting has been called. That it will result in the indictment of the negro is thought certain.

It was in the face of Solicitor Dorsey’s bitterest opposition that the meeting was called at all. Foreman Beattie issued his den [sic] after a previous Grand Jury had been defeated in its efforts to reopen the case with a view of indicting Jim Conley and after Dorsey explicitly had expressed his strongest disapproval of such a move.

Crucial Battle Coming.

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Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 18

Lynching in Lee County, Georgia, January, 1916, based on an actual photograph

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

WHICH GETS MORE coverage in the media: the singular instance of one solitary Jew, Leo Frank (who was duly convicted of the sex murder of a young girl), being lynched — or the literally hundreds of Black men lynched around the same time in the South without even the pretense of a trial, and often for such insubstantial and unsupportable accusations as “wild talk” or “pay dispute”? You may be sure that throughout the 20th and into the 21st century, it is the single case of a Jew being lynched that receives the lion’s share of publicity, the many hundreds of Black lynching victims getting next to none. This tells us a great deal about who runs the media, and about the real power dynamics in today’s America.

In this, the eighteenth audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we also learn of the almost unbelievable disregard for the legal and civil rights of Black people in Georgia’s courts of that time, and the near-impossibility of Black men and women obtaining even the most rudimentary legal representation, to say nothing of anything remotely resembling the gold-plated legal defense and investigative teams marshaled by the Jewish community for Leo Frank, including the full support of many major daily newspapers, periodicals, and New York publishing houses.

 

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Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 17

Albert Lasker, Jewish advertising wizard and kingpin of the Leo Frank PR campaign; despite his efforts for Frank, he said Frank impressed him “as a sexual pervert.”

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

WHILE THE supposedly angelic and innocent Leo Frank and his alleged persecution at the hands of “anti-Semites” was a propaganda asset to the Jewish establishment, did it eventually dawn on Jewish leadership that the real Leo Frank, during any possible new trial they might obtain for him with all its inevitable revelations, might be a disaster for Jewish interests?

 

In this, the seventeenth audio segment of this ground-breaking work originally published by the Nation of Islam, part of their series called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, we also learn that the claim that Jews fled Atlanta (in some accounts, fled the South generally) in large numbers is an utter falsehood. Jews greatly increased their presence in Atlanta and the South during the period of Leo Frank’s trial, appeals, lynching, and aftermath.

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Woodward Uses Clemency Again

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Constitution

Saturday, July 19, 1913

Asserting That He Considers Recorder Mentally Irresponsible, the Mayor Announces Controversy Closed.

With the declaration that no utterance by Recorder Nash R. Broyles will induce him to resort to blackguardism or swerve him in the matter of exercising clemency, Mayor James G. Woodward yesterday reduced the sentence of George Poulas, a Greek retsaurant [sic] keeper, who was fined $100 or thirty days in the stockade for alleged violation of the near beer laws.

The extent of the mayor’s clemency was to reduce the fine assessed against Poulas to $49 or twenty-nine days in jail. Poulas was tried and convicted before W.H. Preston, acting recorder.

Considers Testimony Weak.

Mayor Woodward stated that his reason for pardoning Poulas was because the only witness against him was a 12-year-old negro boy.

“The testimony shows,” said the mayor, “that the negro boy had been in the employ of Poulas, and was discharged. By his own admission his testimony was biased and prejudiced, and hardly worthy of credit against the word of a white man.

V. Mazafladl, Greek consul, and a number of influential men of the Greek colony appeared before the mayor in behalf of Poulas, and made a strong plea for clemency.

Must Be Some Error.

Mayor Woodward said:

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Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 16

The Ku Klux Klan: How many Americans know about its close historic relationship to the Jewish community?

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

IS IT POSSIBLE that the Jewish community — namely, the same forces that launched the massive public relations campaign portraying Leo Frank as an innocent victim of “anti-Semitism” — had a hand in murdering him? If not, then why did the Jewish-owned New York Times (the flagship of the Frank publicity machine) create the evidently fictional “Knights of Mary Phagan” and position them as wanting to lynch Frank some months before the actual lynching? Was one motivation their fear that the repellent and perverse personality of a released Frank would undo all the good that their propaganda had done for the Jewish people? Was another motive their desire to position Jews as “victims of the Klan” in the public’s mind — even though the Jews of that time can more accurately be described as collaborators with the Ku Klux Klan in attacking Black people?

 

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Grand Jury Meets to Indict Conley

Another in our series of new transcriptions of contemporary articles on the Leo Frank case.

The Atlanta Constitution

Saturday, July 19, 1913

Call Is Issued After Solicitor General Hugh Dorsey Had Flatly Refused Request of Foreman.

A call for the Fulton grand jury to meet at 10 o’clock Monday to take steps leading to the indictment of James Conley, the negro sweeper of the National Pencil factory who accuses Leo M. Frank, its superintendent, of the Mary Phagan murder was issued yesterday by Foreman W.D. Beatie [sic] after Solicitor General Hugh M. Dorsey had flatly refused the foreman’s request to call the meeting.

The move to indict Conley is wrong and should not be made, the solicitor told the grand jury foreman when discussing the matter with him and the call which went out was over the head of the state’s legal representative in Fulton county.

Smith Attacks Action

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Audio Book – The Leo Frank Case: The Lynching of a Guilty Man, part 15

On the day after the lynching of Leo Frank, a crowd gathered at the site, where Frank’s body still hung for some hours.

by Philip St. Raymond
for The American Mercury

WHO LYNCHED Leo Frank? The culpability is often laid at the feet of a “mob” in the popular literature that promotes the Establishment’s narrative of the case. But was it a mob? How many “mobs” consist of the leading citizens of the community? How many “mobs” have as their leaders no fewer than two Superior Court judges? A very curious mob indeed!

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